Join Ian Shive @ The Annenberg Space for Photography

“Water & Sky: A Photographic Journey from the Arctic to the Himalaya”

Registration for this event will go live Wednesday, May 26, 12pm PT and Thursday, May 27, 9:30am PT.
Thursday, June 3, 6:30-8:00pm

Click here for more information or to register

Christian CravoJoin award-winning conservation photographer and author Ian Shive at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Century City, CA, on Thursday, June 3, 2010, 6:30 p.m., where he will present an archive of images that examine how our natural world interacts and is connected with the planet’s most valuable but increasingly threatened resource, fresh water, which constitutes 2.5 percent of the 70 percent of all water that covers Earth.

Ian’s photographs will trace the path that Arctic glaciers follow as they transform into rivers on the tundra, give witness to one of the world’s largest collections of terraced waterfalls in Eastern Europe two decades after the Bosnian Conflict of the 90s, as well as exploring the spiritually curative waters of the Ganges in the lower Himalayan Mountains and more.

Ian is the recent recipient of the Gold Medal, 2010 Nautilus Book Award, in the Great Peacekeepers category in recognition of his top-selling book The National Parks: Our American Landscape, released in August 2009 on Earth Aware Editions, for promoting “spiritual growth, conscious living and positive social change…and offering the reader “new possibilities” for a better life and world, joining previous Nautilus Award winners including Deepak Chopra, M.D., Eckhart Tolle, and His Holiness the Dalai Lama, among others.

Referred to as the leading chronicler of America’s National Parks today and a self-labeled “wilderness diplomat,” Ian and his book The National Parks: Our American Landscape were the focus of a presentation on the challenges facing America’s most beloved landscapes in Washington, D.C. in November 2009, hosted by Senators Sheldon Whitehouse and Max Baucus.

Shive has dedicated his life to not only creating memorable photographs but also championing environmental awareness. Using photography as his primary tool, he has pioneered trends with new technologies to further the art of story telling through imagery. His photographs have appeared around the world in every major outdoor publication including National Geographic, National Geographic Adventure, National Geographic Traveler, National Geographic Explorer, Outside Magazine, Sierra Magazine, The Nature Conservancy, National Parks Magazine, andPopular Science, as well as numerous other major publications.

Shive is a resident of Los Angeles, CA.

Ian Shive contributing to Outdoor Photographer blog

Ian Shive is proud to announce that he is one of the contributing bloggers to the newly launched Outdoor Photographer magazine blog. Ian will be contributing not only his own blog entries from around the world, but also OP exclusive entries. Be sure to visit and check out all the other great contributors who are taking part in this exciting new endeavor.

Visit at OutdoorPhotographer.com/blog

California, My Home

I believe that we all feel a vibe, a resonation, with certain places in this world. I’ve heard surfers describe the feeling they get from being in saltwater as electrical, literally. They explain it as the electricity in our bodies producing a charge when dropped in a big bath of salt water like the ocean, a natural conductor. For me, living in the state of California often gives me that same charge. I’m not originally from this state but have been a resident for nearly 13 years, spending most of it exploring this magnificent stretch of land where mountains fade into sea, deserts succumb to fields of wildflowers and the oldest, tallest trees in the world reach for some of the clearest skies in our country. It’s a place where a photographer doesn’t need words to do the job of explanation. Of all of these places, one of my favorites is in Central California on a private ranch where great wine is harvested and horses ride in open fields. I was fortunate enough to spend a few days this week snapping some images that I felt most represented the almost cinematic backdrop that this great state offers.







The National Parks: Our American Landscape wins Gold Nautilus Award

I am pleased to announce that my new book, The National Parks: Our American Landscape, won Gold Place at the 2010 Nautilus Book Awards for Great Peacemakers. The Nautilus Award recognizes Books and Audio Books that promote spiritual growth, conscious living & positive social change,  while at the same time they stimulate the “imagination” and offer the reader “new possibilities” for a better life and a better world.   I am humbled to be in the company of such great past award recipients as Deepak Chopra, M.D., Barbara Kingsolver, Thich Nhat Hanh, Eckhart Tolle, Mariel Hemingway and the Dalai Lama. It is my hope that America’s wild lands and national treasures continue to open new channels for conservation worldwide.

Click here to download the original PDF press release of The National Parks: Our American Landscape

Wild Exposure Episode 4 Launches

Ian Shive Photography in association with Wild Collective has released the final installment of the four part series chronicling the “making of” photographer Ian’s new book, The National Parks: Our American Landscape. In this episode, Shive reflects on one of his favorite national parks, The Channel Islands. Wild Collective shot the footage, sound and photos on location.

IMPACT Photo Exhibition Launches

Welcome to the new IMPACT online exhibition, a project exploring the internet as a venue for insightful photographic work. In an effort to remind viewers of the important role photographers play around the world, an array of imagemakers were invited to share galleries on their blogs (like this one) that comprise 12 images representing an experience when they had an impact on or were impacted. By clicking on the links below the IMPACT logo, you can move through the exhibition, viewing other galleries by different photographers. You can also click the IMPACT logo to be taken to a post on the liveBooks RESOLVE Blog where you can see an index of all participating photographers. We hope that by linking different photographic visions of our first topic, “Outside Looking In,” we can provide a multifaceted view of the topic as well as the IMPACT individuals can have on the world around us.

Ian Shive Photography
Looking back on 2009, it is an obvious fact that my life was consumed with the release of my first book on the American National Parks. I introduced hundreds of new images of our parks through this book and I hoped for two things; that I wasn’t laughed out of the book stores and if I made past that hurdle, that I would have an impact on the way American’s perceive our wild lands. I didn’t just focus on the expected locations such as Old Faithful or  the Grand Canyon, but many of the often overlooked places and details that truly round out the exceptional beauty our parks have become. However I learned that hoping for an impact and actually experiencing one is something a young photographer could not anticipate. As the book reached shelves around the country, emails began to come in via my website. Strangers wrote to me, some were young students, others were avid park visitors, while others were random strangers who happened upon the volume while enjoying a coffee in a book store. Amazingly those people reached out to me sharing their own experiences and their thoughts of a renewed sense of inspiration and hope for the future of our beloved places. While those were undoubtedly a pleasant surprise, what I could never have anticipated was an invite to speak in Washington D.C. at the United States Capitol. On a rainy November night, I found myself before members of Congress and the Director of the National Parks as well as many other leaders, sharing my photos and hopefully, having an impact on their ideas of American wilderness. While this chapter is behind me, I’ve since continued my journey through our parks as well as discovering national parks in other countries who have followed our example. Below are a few images from the book and my continued journey.

Help make a difference for our parks, join the National Parks Conservation Association today and begin receiving National Parks magazine.


Wilderness Diplomacy

Can America’s wilderness be a stepping stone to other key diplomatic solutions around the world? This is the question I asked myself when I was recently presented with some images of my new book, The National Parks: Our American Landscape, as it was presented to college students in the United Arab Emirates. Their response was stunning as they turned  page after page awe struck at the beauty held within the borders of the United States. To my surprise, many had no idea of our national parks or of the great geography of wilderness that connects our country together.  They now saw the USA with new eyes and perhaps, signifying the beginning of a unique approach to how we could find common ground with different cultures by sharing these wonders with them and learning about their own. Could the wild lands be a common ground we all share and admire? Could this common ground open a dialogue with people to find ways to work together in an effort to find peace? I believe so and look forward to working as an environmental diplomat, bridging the chasm between all of our worlds.


Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

What do you dream of when your days are filled with the activities usually reserved for those fantastical visions that come with a quiet, deep sleep? This was the thought that went through my mind as my small Cessna left a dirt and snow runway of the remote backcountry town  of Port Alsworth, Alaska in the last hours of daylight. As the engine sputtered bringing me and my pilot higher and higher, the valley below disappeared into a royal blue shadow punctuated by spearheads of wild salmon pink mountaintops. My door was completely open though I was harnessed to my seat by a four point belt that would make any mother feel a bit more at ease. Still, with temps dipping below zero and traveling at 85 knots, the windchill itself was a dangerous -60 fahrenheit. At these temps, a hot cup of coffee would freeze before it would hit the ground. Wrapped in down jackets but still tearing up as I hung out the side of this small aircraft, we bounced around above the tops of the mountains while I captured image after image of the dreamscape. Elated but not satisfied, I went back up again at sunrise. I struggled to keep the lens steady in the wind while I fought my own breath from fogging up the view finder. These are a few of those images:


Jagged peaks of the Chigmit mountains frame Mt. Iliamna, an active volcano.

Last light on the Aleutian Mountain Range

Last light on the Aleutian Mountain Range